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On this episode of ID The Future, neurosurgery professor Michael Egnor explores the case of Tatiana and Krista, the “Craniopagus Twins.” Their condition, he says, provides evidence against strict materialism. Tatiana and Krista are connected at the thalamus (which controls such things as wakefulness, motor function and vision) through a structure called a thalamic bridge. This bridge enables them to see through each other’s eyes to and control each other’s limbs. Egnor explains how their separate personalities and thoughts nevertheless show that there is something about the mind not reducible to the brain. Egnor also goes through the mind-brain research of Roger Sperry, Benjamin Libet and Wilder Penfield.

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On this episode of ID The Future, host Ray Bohlin talks with Michael Egnor, a pediatric neurosurgeon and professor of neurosurgery at State University of New York Stony Brook about ways modern science validates the idea that the mind is not reducible to the brain. They delve into oddities of neuroscience that indicate that there is more going on in the brain than mere chemistry, and, in particular, walk through the seminal work of Adrian Owen on MRIs and what it reveals.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. David Berlinski continues his exploration of cladistics and the Cambrian explosion. Listen in as Berlinski explains the limitations of cladistic analysis and looks at some specifics of Nick Matzke’s critique of Darwin’s Doubt.

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On this episode of ID The Future, host Tod Butterfield talks with Discovery Senior Fellow Wesley J. Smith about the use and abuse of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in China. Smith delves into the initially humane reasons for PGD, but notes how PGD is being used to advance the dark agenda of eugenics. Smith argues that the international community needs to take a leading role in defending the dignity of all human life. Otherwise, he says, China—with its abhorrent record on human rights—may set the standard for the rest of the world.

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On this episode of ID The Future, biologist Ann Gauger, CSC Director of Science Communications, discusses a big new anthology she contributed to and helped edit, Theistic Evolution. Gauger discusses the reception that the new book recently received at the Evangelical Theological Society meeting, and gives an overview of the book. In her conversation with host Sarah Chaffee, the two home in on the anthology’s contribution from leading chemist James Tour and the problems that synthetic chemistry pose for modern evolutionary theory. Gauger also summarizes a nano-tech breakthrough Tour’s research team has made in cancer research.

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On this episode of ID the Future, CSC Senior Fellow Dr. David Berlinski talks about his views on the debate over Darwinian evolution and intelligent design. Berlinski discusses the "almost reflexive dogmatic reaction" of the Darwin community to Stephen Meyer's argument for intelligent design in Darwin's Doubt, and explains why cladistic analysis doesn't solve the Cambrian mystery

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Casey Luskin continues his talk with Dr. Wolf-Ekkehard Lönnig, a retired biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Germany. Tune in as Dr. Lönnig discusses the origin and biology of carnivorous plants, and how evolutionary theory offers no clear explanation for the unique features of these plants.

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On this episode of ID The Future, Robert Crowther talks with paleontologist Dr. Günter Bechly about his entry on Wikipedia which was created in 2012 and suspiciously disappeared in 2015 when he started supporting Intelligent Design. An eminent paleontologist, Bechly was curator of the State Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, Germany and had numerous species as well as even a family named after him, a high honor in the field. Crowther and Bechly go over the specious reasons given by Wikipedia for Bechly’s deletion, revealing the ideological and authoritarian nature of some of the editors at Wikipedia.

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On this episode of ID the Future, learn about some of scientists’ latest attempts to copy sophisticated designs found in the natural world. This emerging science of imitating nature, known as biomimetics, has attracted extensive research and led to new technologies. As uniform experience has shown, such good design comes not from blind processes, but from a good mind.

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On this episode of ID The Future, we bring you a clip from the documentary Privileged Species a clip arguing that water possesses many unique properties that appear finely tuned to allow for life on Earth. The excerpt dips a toe into what biologist Michael Denton explores in much greater depth in his latest book, The Wonder of Water.

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