History
Icon-add-to-playlist Icon-download Icon-drawer-up
Share this ... ×
...
By ...
Embed:
Copy

On this episode of ID the Future, Rob Crowther discusses controversy in the science classroom with Senior Fellow and historian of science Dr. Michael Keas. Listen in as Keas discusses various areas of controversy, and advises teachers that "science is best taught as science is best practiced."

[PLAY]

On this episode of ID the Future, Ray Bohlin and Michael Behe discuss the limits of evolution. Does evolution innovative by building things, or does it only innovate by breaking things? Behe demonstrates the surprising answer with a closer look at polar bears. Behe is the subject of an engaging new science documentary now available online: Revolutionary.

[PLAY]
460>_393767

In this episode of ID the Future, geneticist and biochemist Michael Denton reads the beautiful introduction to his new book, The Wonder of Water. He begins at Yosemite’s Bridalveil Fall and explores how water is curiously fine-tuned for life. Indeed, thanks to a unique cluster of properties, water is able to fulfill many roles essential to our living planet. It’s thanks to some of those properties that rivers and streams can leech and carry minerals from rock to various places they’re needed in the biosphere. Water’s unusual properties also make it an ideal medium for our circulatory system. There it serves not only to transfer nutrients and oxygen but also expel carbon dioxide, excess body heat, and waste products—again, thanks to a unique cluster of properties. Denton’s new book can be purchased here.

[PLAY]
460>_393767

On this episode of ID the Future, Brian Miller, who holds a Ph.D. in physics from Duke University, examines Dr. Jeremy England’s physics-based theory of the origin of life. England’s theory, based on his studies of “non-equilibrium systems,” suggests that a system driven strongly enough could create order and therefore be a potential explanation for the origin of life. Miller summarizes the theory and discusses what he sees as its fatal weaknesses.

[PLAY]

On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Stephen Meyer is on The Universe Next Door to discuss Thomas Nagel's controversial book Mind & Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature Is Almost Certainly False. Nagel, a leading philosopher of science and a self-described agnostic, tells in his book how he has become disenchanted with the materialist worldview, and how science today leaves fundamental questions unanswered--such as the nature of mind and consciousness. Meyer also discusses the origin of animal body plans and the inference to design.

[PLAY]
460>_393767

An actor in Hollywood raises the important question of when people should and shouldn’t be skeptical of claims made in the name of science, inspiring a response from political scientist John West, author of Darwin Day in America. This conversation was taped live in Hollywood during a discussion after the final performance of Disinherit the Wind, a play that tells the story of a neurobiologist who sues his university for the right to challenge neo-Darwinian evolution.

[PLAY]
460>_393767

On this episode of ID the Future, Zombie Science author Jonathan Wells talks about his multifaceted, impressive and, at times, quirky educational history. Dr. Wells started as an undergrad geology major at Princeton and later moved to Berkeley to finish his undergraduate work. He was arrested as a conscientious objector and saw the ugly side of the anti-war movement. Disgusted, he moved to the remote mountains and there discovered evidence of intelligent design. After snagging a Ph.D. in theology from Yale, he returned Berkeley for his second Ph.D., this one in embryology. It was in studying embryos that Dr. Wells came across his first Icon of Evolution, Haeckel’s embryos. More icons soon followed. These and the dogmatism of the scientific materialists are explored in his newest book, Zombie Science: More Icons of Evolution.

[PLAY]

On this episode of ID the Future, Tom Woodward interviews CSC Senior Fellow John G. West on the radio show, The Universe Next Door. They discuss Michael Behe's two decades of influence through Darwin's Black Box, published in 1996, and the film detailing his story.

Watch Revolutionary now, available for free online at www.revolutionarybehe.com.

[PLAY]
460>_393767

On this episode of ID the Future, Ray Bohlin interviews physician Howard Glicksman about hemoglobin and the body's need to have enough of it to transport sufficient oxygen to the tissues. Finely-tuned and exquisitely engineered, this system gave our ancestors enough oxygen to not only stay alive but thrive in the face of hostile challenges. Dr. Glicksman is author of an extended series of posts at Evolution News & Science Today, “The Designed Body.”

[PLAY]
460>_393767

An accountant wonders how people can separate fact from faith in scientific claims, and biologist Jonathan Wells (author of Zombie Science) and playwright Matt Chait respond. This conversation was taped live in Hollywood during a discussion after the final performance of Disinherit the Wind, a play that tells the story of a neurobiologist who sues his university for the right to challenge neo-Darwinian evolution.

[PLAY]

Next Page