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On this episode of ID The Future, Sarah Chaffee interviews Center for Science and Culture Research Coordinator Dr. Brian Miller about co-evolution. Together they explore a recent paper on the subject by Winston Ewert and Robert Marks in BIO-Complexity.

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On this episode of ID the Future, hear part 2 of a lecture given by David Snoke at a conference sponsored by the Christian Scientific Society. In this segment, Dr. Snoke, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburg, discusses the relationship between information and entropy.

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On this episode of ID the Future, listen to a lecture given by David Snoke at a conference sponsored by the Christian Scientific Society. Dr. Snoke, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburg, answers the question is information a physical entity?, and discusses the nature of information processing systems.

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On this episode of ID the Future, listen to Michael Denton read an excerpt of his new volume, The Wonder of Water. In the book, Denton delves into this grand untold story and explores how water is specially equipped to allow life to flourish on our blue planet. This ever-present substance is amazingly fit in a myriad of ways to sustain life on earth, especially human life. Its unique properties allow it to fill many roles throughout the biological world, from forming the matrix of our cells, to regulating the temperature of our planet. 

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On this episode of ID the Future, Rob Crowther discusses controversy in the science classroom with Senior Fellow and historian of science Dr. Michael Keas. Listen in as Keas discusses various areas of controversy, and advises teachers that "science is best taught as science is best practiced."

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On this episode of ID the Future, Ray Bohlin and Michael Behe discuss the limits of evolution. Does evolution innovative by building things, or does it only innovate by breaking things? Behe demonstrates the surprising answer with a closer look at polar bears. Behe is the subject of an engaging new science documentary now available online: Revolutionary.

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In this episode of ID the Future, geneticist and biochemist Michael Denton reads the beautiful introduction to his new book, The Wonder of Water. He begins at Yosemite’s Bridalveil Fall and explores how water is curiously fine-tuned for life. Indeed, thanks to a unique cluster of properties, water is able to fulfill many roles essential to our living planet. It’s thanks to some of those properties that rivers and streams can leech and carry minerals from rock to various places they’re needed in the biosphere. Water’s unusual properties also make it an ideal medium for our circulatory system. There it serves not only to transfer nutrients and oxygen but also expel carbon dioxide, excess body heat, and waste products—again, thanks to a unique cluster of properties. Denton’s new book can be purchased here.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Brian Miller, who holds a Ph.D. in physics from Duke University, examines Dr. Jeremy England’s physics-based theory of the origin of life. England’s theory, based on his studies of “non-equilibrium systems,” suggests that a system driven strongly enough could create order and therefore be a potential explanation for the origin of life. Miller summarizes the theory and discusses what he sees as its fatal weaknesses.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Stephen Meyer is on The Universe Next Door to discuss Thomas Nagel's controversial book Mind & Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature Is Almost Certainly False. Nagel, a leading philosopher of science and a self-described agnostic, tells in his book how he has become disenchanted with the materialist worldview, and how science today leaves fundamental questions unanswered--such as the nature of mind and consciousness. Meyer also discusses the origin of animal body plans and the inference to design.

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An actor in Hollywood raises the important question of when people should and shouldn’t be skeptical of claims made in the name of science, inspiring a response from political scientist John West, author of Darwin Day in America. This conversation was taped live in Hollywood during a discussion after the final performance of Disinherit the Wind, a play that tells the story of a neurobiologist who sues his university for the right to challenge neo-Darwinian evolution.

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