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On this episode of ID the Future, David Boze talks with Casey Luskin about the Precambrian fossil Vernanimalcula, which was thought to be the proof that Darwinists needed to refute the idea of the Cambrian explosion--the idea that life exploded in complexity during a specific period of time. Vernanimalcula was thought to be the Precambrian ancestor of all bilaterian animals, dating back to tens of millions of years prior to the Cambrian explosion. However, a new article published in Evolution & Development has concluded that "There is no evidential basis for interpreting Vernanimalcula as an animal, let alone a bilaterian."

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Evolutionists often speak in generalities about beneficial mutations. Such mutations may be rare, we're assured, but they happen, and when they do, natural selection is there to capture, preserve and pass them along. All right, we now have some data to consider. We can put a number to the frequency of beneficial mutations in a very large sample. The number is ...

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On this episode of ID the Future, Ann Gauger discusses physiological, anatomical, cultural and behavioral differences between humans and chimpanzees. How long would it take to acquire needed mutations by Darwinian mechanisms? Much, much longer than the available timeframe, says Dr. Gauger.

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Jay Richards, a Senior Fellow of Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture, draws on his expertise in theology and intelligent design to refute the charge that ID is bad theology. As he shows, critics who level the charge manage the hat trick of simultaneously misunderstanding intelligent design and theism.

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Why do so many people follow the Hollywood soap opera that is Brangelina? Angela Chen of The Verge recently offered up Darwinism's favorite go-to explanation: Evolution did it. Center for Science and Culture Senior Fellow Jonathan Witt explains why this explanation just isn’t very fit.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Ann Gauger discusses so-called "junk" DNA. She explains species-specific mobile genetic elements and how our DNA is used. Listen in to learn about our computer-like genome!

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On this episode of ID the Future, Douglas Axe reflects on the recent Beyond Materialism conference in London. Axe notes, “I think these temperature checks give us hope that the tables are turning and that design is growing as a way of thinking and there could be a breaking point where a whole lot of people come out in favor of design.”

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"We don't splice our DNA the same way chimps do," says Dr. Ann Gauger. On this episode of ID the Future, she discusses human and chimpanzee genomes. Did you know that one stretch of DNA can code for multiple proteins? Listen in to learn more about how your DNA is different, and is expressed differently, than chimps!

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Do we have 99% of our DNA in common with chimps? On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Ann Gauger discusses human and chimpanzee genomes. What is a genome? How is it sequenced? And what is a better estimate of the similarity between our genome and that of chimps?

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On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. David Snoke talks with Casey Luskin about his newly published paper, "Systems Biology as a Research Program for Intelligent Design." Dr. Snoke explains what systems biology is and how it arose, and looks and how the approach, putting intelligent design concepts into practice, has seen successful results.

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