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On this episode of ID The Future, Ray Bohlin talks with CSC Senior Fellow Jonathan Wells, author of the Zombie Science, about some new hype over Darwin’s finches, an icon of evolution that just won’t die. Seventeen years after Icons of Evolution, Darwin’s finches are back in the news and can still be found in biology textbooks despite the fact that they illustrate no net evolutionary change nor did they play a role in helping Darwin formulate his theory.

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On this episode of ID The Future, John West, Associate Director of the Center for Science & Culture and author of Walt Disney and Live Action: The Disney Studio's Live-Action Features of the 1950s and 60s talks about how science is portrayed in Walt Disney’s films and theme parks. Disney’s worldview was an interesting blend of 19th century morals with a 21st century vision for science and technology. A futurist, Disney was given to techno-utopianism and his works tended to reflect this, but have also bore warning messages about the dangers posed by both science and technology. John West explores these interests both in his exhibits and his film works.

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On this episode of ID The Future, Robert Crowther explores the dangers and potential of artificial intelligence with Dr. Robert Marks, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Baylor University and co-author of Introduction to Evolutionary Informatics. Marks uses John Searle’s “Chinese Room” analogy to explain why computers do not have understanding and never will. At the same time, Marks predicts that continuing advances in technology will further augment our abilities.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Jonathan Wells discusses a popular claim, which he describes as “DNA makes RNA makes protein makes us”—or, every organism contains a program for itself in its DNA. Though this view fits neatly with the perspective of Darwinian evolution, it has been shown to be incorrect at every step. Listen in as Dr. Wells explains.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Wolf-Ekkehard Lönnig, an expert in plant breeding and formerly affiliated with the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Germany, further explores that clash of views modern evolutionists often paper over—Darwinism vs. Mendel. Lönnig discusses how Darwinian evolutionary biology held back acceptance of the laws of inheritance, discovered by Gregor Mendel, abbot at the Augustinian Abbey of St. Thomas, Brunn.

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On this episode of ID the Future, geneticist Wolf-Ekkehard Lönnig digs further into Gregor Mendel’s laws of inheritance and how they opposed the thinking of Darwin. Lönnig explains how Darwinian evolution hindered the acceptance of Mendel’s genetic laws, and how the laws still came to be accepted.

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On this episode of ID the Future, geneticist Wolf-Ekkehard Lönnig discusses Gregor Mendel’s laws of inheritance and how they opposed the thinking of Darwin. Listen in as he explains Mendel’s laws and why they are still relevant for biology, and particularly genetics.

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This special reposted episode of ID the Future features Tom Woodward and The Universe Next Door to explore the mysterious origin of birds. A series of papers published in the journal Science presents evidence of the abrupt appearance of major bird groups. Listen in as to learn how these findings support the theory of intelligent design.

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On this episode of ID The Future, John West, Associate Director of the Center for Science & Culture and author of Walt Disney and Live Action: The Disney Studio's Live-Action Features of the 1950s and 60s talks about Walt Disney’s life-long fascination with evolution. By exploring the subtle messages promoted by Disney’s theme parks and animated features West shows that evolution rather than being a one-off was an recurring fascination of Disney’s. From the Magic Skyway created for the 1964 World’s Fair to the 1948 animated film Fantasia we see Disney’s recurrent contemplation of evolution. Fantasia explored worldviews from rationalism to materialism to animism. On first blush Fantasia’s “Rite of Spring” seems to promote Darwinian Materialism but is really an expose showing nature in all its cruelty. On the Magic Skyway animatronics were used to tell stories of ages past from the age of the dinosaurs to the arrival of man. Disney skirted the origins of humans but the narration suggested that man was something different.

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On this episode of ID The Future, Robert Crowther talks with Dr. Robert Marks, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Baylor University and author of Introduction to Evolutionary Informatics, about artificial intelligence and its limits. From the jump they delve into what artificial intelligence and computers will never be able to do, that is non-algorithmic tasks, and what examples of those look like such as creativity and consciousness. Marks goes over the popular tests for consciousness (Turing Test & Lovelace Test) and explains why computers still have not passed it and never will.

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