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On this episode of ID The Future, Robert Marks and Winston Ewert, both of the Evolutionary Informatics Lab, discuss three of their recently published papers dealing with evolutionary informatics, algorithmic specified complexity and how information makes evolution work. This is the second of three segments. Conway’s Game of Life is played on a rectangular grid. Cells live or die depending on the cells that surround them. Hobbyists have designed highly complex and interesting patterns using Conway’s four simple rules of birth, death and survival. Patterns include oscillators, spaceships and glider guns. Dr. Winston Ewert explains how the theory of algorithmic specified complexity can be applied to measure, in bits, the degree to which these cellular automata life forms are designed. The discussion centers around the peer-reviewed journal article:
Winston Ewert, William A. Dembski and Robert J. Marks II, "Algorithmic Specified Complexity in the Game of Life," IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics: Systems, Volume 45, Issue 4, April 2015, pp. 584-594 DOI: 10.1109/TSMC.2014.2331917
The paper is available online here: http://robertmarks.org/REPRINTS/2015_AlgorithmicSpecifiedComplexityInTheGameOfLife.pdf
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On this episode of ID the Future, hear an excerpt of a presentation by Dr. Ann Gauger, recorded at a “Science and Human Origins” conference, sponsored by Discovery Institute in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho on Sept. 20, 2014. In this segment, Ann Gauger discusses why there isn’t enough time in the fossil record to account for human/chimp genetic differences.

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On this episode of ID The Future, Robert Marks and Winston Ewert, both of the Evolutionary Informatics Lab, discuss three of their recently published papers dealing with evolutionary informatics, algorithmic specified complexity and how information makes evolution work. This is the first of three segments. Dr. Winston Ewert, a Senior Research Scientist at both Biologic Institute and the Evolutionary Informatics lab, discusses the mathematical foundation for why we know Mount Rushmore is designed and Mount Fuji isn’t. The mathematical theory of algorithmic specified complexity is introduced and illustrated. A single complex snowflake, for example, displays essentially zero algorithmic specified complexity whereas two identical snowflakes earns a high algorithmic specified complexity. The model discussed by Dr. Ewert can also measure algorithmic specified complexity in units of bits in the context of poker. Dr. Ewert explains how a Royal Flush has a high algorithmic specified complexity of about 16 bits whereas a poker hand with a single pair has essentially zero algorithmic specified complexity. The theory Dr. Ewert discusses is developed in the paper:
Winston Ewert, William A. Dembski, Robert J. Marks II, “Algorithmic Specified Complexity,” in Engineering and the Ultimate: An Interdisciplinary Investigation of Order and Design in Nature and Craft, edited by Jonathan Bartlett, Dominic Halsmer and Mark Hall (Blyth Institute Press, 2014), pp.131-149.
The paper is available online here: http://robertmarks.org/REPRINTS/2014_AlgorithmicSpecifiedComplexity.pdf
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In this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Tim Standish, senior scientist at the Geoscience Research Institute, and adjunct faculty member at Loma Linda University, where he teaches molecular genetics. Dr. Standish shares about Living Waters and his personal interest in intelligent design.

Join us on Friday, February 5 for the greater Houston premiere of the new intelligent design film, Living Waters: Intelligent Design in the Oceans of the Earth. The event will feature Paul Nelson and Lee Strobel. The film premiere is free, but registration is required. Find out more!

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On this episode of ID The Future, mathematician David Berlinski joins biochemist Michael Denton for continued discussion on the difficulties of Darwinian evolution to be a viable modern theory of the origin and development of life and the cosmos. On this episode, Berlinski explains why many conservative intellectuals have trouble doubting Darwin. Denton suggests that the mechanistic, Darwinian framework will eventually collapse, and reviews the essential differences in worldview between the Darwin supporter and the Darwin doubter. Tune in to the final episode of this stimulating exchange!

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Biologist Michael Denton published the groundbreaking Evolution: A Theory in Crisis more than 30 years ago. On this episode of ID the Future, we will be giving you a special preview of biologist Michael Denton’s new book, Evolution: Still a Theory in Crisis, and hearing from Denton and biochemist Michael Behe.

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On this episode of ID the Future, listen to Dr. Steven Dunbar, graduate biology program director in the Earth and Biological Sciences department at Loma Linda University and president of the Protective Turtle Ecology Center for Training, Outreach and Research (ProTECTOR) discuss the work of ProTECTOR, his involvement with Living Waters, and the complexity of sea turtles’ magnetic maps. Join us on Friday, February 5 for the greater Houston premiere of the new intelligent design film, Living Waters: Intelligent Design in the Oceans of the Earth. The event will feature Paul Nelson and Lee Strobel. The film premiere is free, but registration is required. Find out more! Living Waters is now out on DVD. Buy it today!
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On this episode of ID The Future, philosopher and author David Berlinski joins geneticist and researcher Michael Denton for continued discussion on the debate over Darwinian evolution. Why has the theory persisted? What weaknesses threaten its existence in the 21st century?
As Berlinski puts it: "...applying Darwinian principles to problems of this level of complexity is like putting a Band-Aid on a wound caused by an atomic weapon. It's just not going to work." Listen in as Berlinski and Denton explain why the Darwinian mechanism is being widely questioned as a viable theory of the origin and development of life.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Casey Luskin interviews Wayne Rossiter, author of Shadow of Oz: Theistic Evolution and the Absent God. Rossiter shares about the biggest scientific and theological problems he sees with theistic evolution.

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In this episode of ID the Future, John West, Associate Director of the Center for Science and Culture, discusses a recent effort by the United Methodist church to ban Discovery Institute from sponsoring an information table at its upcoming General Conference. Listen in to learn about the situation and find out what you can do to help overturn the ban.

Visit discovery.org/umc to send a message to United Methodist officials.

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