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On the episode of ID the Future, historian of science Mike Keas interviews philosopher of biology Paul Nelson on his contribution to the important new volume Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique, focusing his discussion on the theory of universal common descent. How do we know it’s true? How would we know if it isn’t? And do our philosophical commitments allow us to listen to the evidence nature provides? 

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On this episode of ID the Future, Steve Laufmann is on the show to discuss an article he published at Evolution News, in which he examines the heart of the debate of whether intelligent design is science. Laufmann discusses the application of demarcation criteria, as well as the role of worldview and bias.

Mr. Laufmann is a consultant in the growing field of Enterprise Architecture, dealing with the design of very large, very complex, composite information systems that are orchestrated to perform specified tasks in demanding environments.

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On this episode of ID The Future, we continue a series on human origins with biologist Ann Gauger, CSC Director of Science Communications. Gauger centers her discussion around a big new anthology from Crossway Books that she contributed to and helped edit, Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique. Today’s episode delves into chimp and human DNA. Really, how similar are our genomes? Do protein-coding stretches of DNA tell the whole story? And is there enough time for genetic mutations to build the novelties that separate humans all other primates?

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On this episode of ID The Future, computer engineer Robert Marks, co-author of Introduction to Evolutionary Informatics, considers the apocalyptic danger portrayed in The Terminator movies and discussed in all seriousness by some prominent scientists and technologists—the threat of artificial intelligence one day taking over the world. Yes, computing power doubles every couple of years or so, but Dr. Marks insists that a qualitative gulf separates humans from computers, a difference that no amount of computing power can ever overcome. Listen in to learn what it is.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Sarah Chaffee interviews Ann Gauger about intelligent design laboratory research. Dr. Gauger explains several key projects, including Behe's review of peer-reviewed work on bacteria and viruses, Biologic's work with proteins and enzymes, and how these impact the evolution debate.

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On this episode of ID The Future, we begin a series on human origins with biologist Ann Gauger, CSC Director of Science Communications. Gauger centers her discussion around a big new anthology from Crossway Books that she contributed to and helped edit, Theistic Evolution: A Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Critique. Among the tenets of theistic evolution is the idea that humans evolved from a large population of ape-like creatures. But is that idea scientifically plausible? Today’s episode delves into the fossil evidence. Listen in as Gauger describes not a mere gap in the fossil record but a great gulf, between australopithecines (an ancient ape-like creature) and humans.  

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On this episode of ID The Future, Ray Bohlin talks with CSC Senior Fellow Jonathan Wells, author of the Zombie Science, about some new hype over Darwin’s finches, an icon of evolution that just won’t die. Seventeen years after Icons of Evolution, Darwin’s finches are back in the news and can still be found in biology textbooks despite the fact that they illustrate no net evolutionary change nor did they play a role in helping Darwin formulate his theory.

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On this episode of ID The Future, John West, Associate Director of the Center for Science & Culture and author of Walt Disney and Live Action: The Disney Studio's Live-Action Features of the 1950s and 60s talks about how science is portrayed in Walt Disney’s films and theme parks. Disney’s worldview was an interesting blend of 19th century morals with a 21st century vision for science and technology. A futurist, Disney was given to techno-utopianism and his works tended to reflect this, but have also bore warning messages about the dangers posed by both science and technology. John West explores these interests both in his exhibits and his film works.

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On this episode of ID The Future, Robert Crowther explores the dangers and potential of artificial intelligence with Dr. Robert Marks, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Baylor University and co-author of Introduction to Evolutionary Informatics. Marks uses John Searle’s “Chinese Room” analogy to explain why computers do not have understanding and never will. At the same time, Marks predicts that continuing advances in technology will further augment our abilities.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Jonathan Wells discusses a popular claim, which he describes as “DNA makes RNA makes protein makes us”—or, every organism contains a program for itself in its DNA. Though this view fits neatly with the perspective of Darwinian evolution, it has been shown to be incorrect at every step. Listen in as Dr. Wells explains.

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