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On this episode of ID the Future, Jorn Dyerberg, the Danish biologist and co-discoverer of the role of omega-3 fatty acids in human health and nutrition, talks with Brian Miller about finding irreducible complexity in cells 40 years ago. It wasn’t until he encountered ID researchers like Michael Behe that he gave it that name — but he saw how many enzymes and co-enzymes it took working together to make metabolism work in every living cell. And if neo-Darwinism is true, and these enzymes showed up one at a time, “And over these eons, the other enzymes would just be sitting there waiting for the next one to come.”
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On this episode of ID the Future historian Michael Flannery continues discussion of his new book Nature’s Prophet: Alfred Russel Wallace and His Evolution from Natural Selection to Natural Theology. Flannery tells how Wallace became convinced of some “overruling intelligence” in nature — not because of “gaps” in what he knew, but because so many human attributes demand a better explanation than Darwin’s own “utility principle.” They called for a cause adequate to the effects. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Casey Luskin talks with Dr. Cornelius Hunter—a Discovery Institute Fellow, adjunct professor, and author—about his website Darwin’s Predictions, which critically examines 22 fundamental predictions of evolutionary theory.  In this third podcast of the series, Dr. Hunter discusses how mutations are adaptive and features of James Shapiro’s natural genetic engineering model.

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On this episode of ID the Future, historian Michael Flannery discusses his just-released book Nature’s Prophet: Alfred Russel Wallace and His Evolution from Natural Selection to Natural Theology. It’s the intellectual history of Wallace, who is credited with independently propounding the the theory of evolution by natural selection. Darwin insisted on a purely materialistic version of the theory, but as Wallace studied the evidence, he grew convinced that intelligent design also played a role in the history of life, particularly in the origin of humans. Though not a religious person, he broke with the rising scientism of his day to argue that there must be some “overruling intelligence” behind nature.
Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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On this episode of ID the Future, author and professor Nancy Pearcey draws on her new book Love Thy Body: Answering Hard Questions About Life and Sexuality to explore two inconsistencies she sees with philosophical materialists. One inconsistency is their unlivable claim that “we have no free will.” The other is the materialist credo to take our cues from nature — except when it comes to the male or female sexual makeup of one’s body.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Dr. Cornelius Hunter shares about his website Darwin’s Predictions, which critically examines 22 fundamental predictions of evolutionary theory.  In this second podcast of the series, Dr. Hunter discusses the uniqueness of DNA code and differences in fundamental molecules.
Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Robert Crowther talks with author Jay Richards about Richards’ new book The Human Advantage: The Future of American Work in an Age of Smart Machines. Science fiction tantalizes us — and pundits terrorize us — with images of  intelligent machines taking over for humans. Really taking over, as in replacing us. Some thinkers even say that’s just the next phase, since we’re machines ourselves. Jay Richards explains how that’s wrong, and there’s a lot more to hope for than to fear in our future with our new smart machines.
Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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On this episode of ID the Future, host Tod Butterfield talks with CSC Fellow and professor Nancy Pearcey about her new book Love Thy Body: Answering Hard Questions About Life and Sexuality. Who — or what — determines what we are? Why does it matter? And how should we act in light of the answers to those questions? Pearcey explores these questions, and explains how just about everything in ethics — including sexuality — begins with what we think about whether life has a design and a purpose.

Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Dr. Cornelius Hunter talks about his website Darwin’s Predictions, which critically examines 22 fundamental predictions of evolutionary theory. In this first podcast of the series, Dr. Hunter discusses why he was inspired to pursue this work.
Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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Today’s episode of ID the Future features “In the Market” radio host Janet Parshall interviewing Center for Science and Culture senior fellow Jonathan Witt, co-author of the recent book Heretic: One Scientist’s Journey from Darwin to Design. Witt and Parshall discuss the book Heretic, some brave anti-Darwin heretics, and a recent scholarly study claiming to show that greater science education and science literacy encourages acceptance of evolution. Witt highlights what he sees as some glaring problems in the study’s survey, and in the way Darwinian evolution is normally taught.
Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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