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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, hear more from Dr. Cornelius Hunter, who signed up to take an online college-level course on evolution. Dr. Hunter discusses the dogmatic arguments for Darwinian evolution that he encountered and his experience dialoguing with fellow students.

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On this episode of ID the Future host Andrew McDiarmid continues his series with science historian Michael Keas about Mike’s new work from ISI Books, Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Here they focus on the myth that a vast cosmos renders humanity insignificant, and in the process, discredits the Judeo-Christian worldview. As Keas notes, science popularizer Bill Nye recently dusted off this old saw, but the Old Testament itself, in the Psalms, depicts man and the earth as tiny in compared to a vast universe. Keas also discusses C.S. Lewis’s take on the matter. Lewis pointed out that atheists have argued that a universe where earth is the lone habitable planet argues against God. And they have argued that a universe filled with many habitable planets argues against God. Heads the atheists win; tails the theists lose. As Lewis and Keas suggest, we are rightly skeptical of such rigged games. Listen in to learn more about this complex and fascinating issue touching on philosophy, theology, and the history of science. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Kirby Anderson, host of the nationally syndicated Point of View radio show, interviews New York Times bestselling author Stephen Meyer about the Dallas Conference on Science and Faith, featuring Meyer, Eric Metaxas, Jay Richards, and renowned synthetic organic chemist James Tour of Rice University. Learn more about the Jan. 18-19 conference here (https://www.discovery.org/e/5848).

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On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid talks with science historian Michael Keas about Keas’ revealing new work from ISI Books, Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. “Scientists do love a good story,” says Keas. “Turns out there are plenty of stories we shouldn’t believe, myths about science and Christianity supposedly at war with each other.” He also discusses a future-oriented ET myth that functions as a substitute for traditional religion. Listen in to learn more about Keas fascinating and informative new book.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, hear from CSC Fellow Dr. Cornelius Hunter, who signed up to take a free online course at Coursera titled “Introduction to Genetics and Evolution,” taught by Duke University professor Mohamed Noor. Tune in as Dr. Hunter shares about his experience & discusses the misrepresentations and fallacies that are presented in the typical undergraduate evolutionary biology course.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Ira Berkowitz interviews Rabbi Moshe Averick, author of Nonsense of a High Order: The Confused World of Modern Atheism, about Stephen Hawking’s comments on God and religion in Hawking’s posthumously published Brief Answers to the Big Questions. Averick describes the work as “superficial,” “convenient” and marked by “a glaring lack of profundity.”  Or as the rabbi puts it, “If he did physics that way his university would have fired him.” Listen in to hear why Averick has such a problem with the new book.

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On this episode of ID the Future, host David Boze talks with Dr. Jay Richards, a contributor to The Magician’s Twin: C. S. Lewis on Science, Scientism, and Society.  Dr. Richards discusses Lewis’ argument that one cannot consistently believe in both the validity of human reason and the truth of naturalism.

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On this episode of ID the Future, host Sarah Chaffee talks with Center for Science and Culture Research Coordinator Brian Miller about the growing ID underground, based on his recent Evolution News article on the subject. As many as one-quarter of Harvard post-docs in relevant fields privately express sympathy for ID. More and more scientists who don’t agree with ID are at least standing up against common “sound-bite” misrepresentations. Compared to other major paradigm shifts in science history, ID is right on track. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.
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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, David Boze and Dr. John West conclude their conversation on The Magician’s Twin: C. S. Lewis on Science, Scientism, and Society. They discuss Lewis’ views on the limitations of science and the need for moral restraints; what Lewis meant by “men without chests”; and what kind of call-to-action should come from reading C. S. Lewis. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Nancy Pearcey returns to explain what historians know, but few of the rest of us do: Charles Darwin’s science grew out of his naturalistic philosophy, not the other way around. One historian said Darwin’s naturalism came first, and “only later did he find a theory to validate his convictions.” His “bulldog”, T.H. Huxley, like Darwinism more for its philosophy than its science. And even Darwin admitted the evidence wasn’t all it could or should be. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

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