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On this episode of ID the Future, Jay Richards interviews astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez on the first images ever taken of a black hole, released to the public early in April 2019. Not that it’s exactly an “image,” for as Gonzalez explains, no light can escape a black hole. But this massive object — equaling billions of suns in mass — in the M87 galaxy still provides important information, adding to the list of confirmations for Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, which also provides further support for Big Bang cosmology. And that, in turn, tells us our universe isn’t infinitely old — so where did it come from, if not an intelligent designer?

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On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid continues his series with Michael Behe about Behe’s new book Darwin Devolves: The New Science about DNA That Challenges Evolution. Here Behe explains the “Revenge of the Principle of Comparative Difficulty,” According to this principle, evolution it is much easier for evolution to create a new adaptive niche by damaging one or more genes than even the simplest new genes and irreducibly complex structures. Along the way, Behe also explores how biology got enamored of mathematical theory built on “hopeful ignorance” regarding the nature of genes.

Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.
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On this episode of ID the Future, CSC Senior Fellow Ann Gauger discusses the library of the cell.  She delves into transcription and translation and the speed with which these processes take place. Listen in to learn more about the workings of the cell!

On this episode of ID the Future, Emily Kurlinski speaks with author and professor Melissa Cain Travis about the path that led to her work in the field of science and faith, and the writing of her book Science and the Mind of the Maker: What the Conversation Between Faith and Science Reveals about God. It started for her at a conference ten years ago where she heard Dr. Michael Behe sharing on intelligent design a conference. That led to studies and research on science and faith, and a commitment communicating it understandably for lay persons. Early next month it comes full circle, as she’ll be sharing the program with him and others at the May 3-4 Discovery Institute conference “Reasons 2019: New Conversations on Science and Faith” in Houston (see discovery.org/events to register).

On this episode of ID the Future, biochemist Michael Behe speaks further about his new book Darwin Devolves: The New Science about DNA That Challenges Evolution. Behe explains how evolutionists in the past had freedom to use their imaginations to suppose ways evolution could achieve major innovations, but new research at the molecular level now reveals obstacles previously unimagined. The most productive adaptations in nature tend overwhelmingly to be in one direction, Behe says, degrading or destroying genes, and no series of mutations have ever demonstrated the kind of coordinated effects needed to produce new systems.

On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Todd Butterfield interviews Michael Flannery, author of Alfred Russel Wallace: A Rediscovered Life. Flannery discusses his article on the Greek philosopher Anaxagoras (ca. 500-428 B.C.), who was one of the first to articulate an argument for design in nature. Read the article here!

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On this episode of ID the Future, Emily Kurlinski interviews bioethicist, author, and Discovery Institute Senior Fellow Wesley J. Smith on transhumanism. It’s a technology-driven anti-aging effort to create a post-human species with advanced intelligence, brain-computer interfaces, and even immortality. Built on zeal and desperation to defeat death, it’s a quasi religion, except with no plan or apparent interest in cultivating a more wise and loving human species — which, Smith argues, makes it more dangerous than it might at first appear. Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast: idthefuture.org/donate.

This episode of ID the Future features the second and concluding part of a talk given by Stephen Meyer at the 2019 Dallas Science and Faith Conference. Picking up from his previous comments on how atheistic/materialistic assumptions have come to dominate much of the science community. That’s the bad news. The good news, Meyer says, is the the discovery of multiple lines of scientfic evidence with theism-friendly implications, including confirmation that our universe had a beginning, a development “anticipated by no one except the theologians,” in the words of astronomer Robert Jastrow. Materialistic atheism can’t effectively explain where that finely tuned Big Bang came from, but “Let there be light” — God’s first words in Genesis — provides a great explanation. Meyer offers this and other lines of evidence for theism in this talk, drawn from his upcoming book, The Return of the God Hypothesis, now available for pre-order at Amazon.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, the CSC’s Dr. Paul Nelson talks with Dr. Wolf-Ekkehard Lönnig, retired geneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Germany, about randomness in natural selection and why randomness is such a controversial topic.

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This episode of ID the Future features part one of a talk given by Stephen Meyer at the 2019 Dallas Science and Faith Conference. In this portion of the talk, Meyer explains Christianity’s crucial influence on the founders of science, and how much of the scientific establishment has shifted toward methodological atheism. His talk draws on his upcoming book, The Return of the God Hypothesis: Compelling Evidence for the Existence of God, available for pre-order now at Amazon.com.

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