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On this episode of ID the Future, Andrew McDiarmid reads a popular essay by philosopher of science Stephen Meyer on the detectability of intelligent design in nature. The article recently appeared in Sapientia, and here at Evolution News. In the piece, Meyer explains the logic by which we routinely know there’s been a creative intelligence at work. Meyer unpacks this logic in terms of information, which we can see clearly in the cell, but elsewhere in nature, too. He also shows how this detection method is an established part of the historical sciences.

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On this episode of ID the Future, physician Howard Glicksman explains the hugely complex blood flow systems required to keep us clear-headed and alive even while doing everything from gymnastics to simply getting up in the morning. There are various methods the heart and blood vessels use to keep the body properly supplied. It’s also about hormones and nervous-system signaling. Does Darwinism provide a satisfactory explanation for such an intricately coordinated system? Dr. Glicksman argues that it does not, and that a far better explanation is intelligent design.

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On this episode of ID the Future Dr. Ann Gauger shares more about her experimental work evolving enzymes in the lab, honing in on how complex and specified enzymes are generated and testing Darwinian predictions experimentally. Listen in as she shares what she discovered about an insurmountable problem for evolution. Ann Gauger received a BS in biology from MIT, and a PhD in developmental biology from the University of Washington, where she studied cell adhesion molecules involved in Drosophila embryogenesis. As a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard she cloned and characterized the Drosophila kinesin light chain. Her research has been published in Nature, Development, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

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On this episode of ID the Future, biologist Jonathan Wells talks with Ray Bohlin about a conversation he imagined between evolutionists Richard Dawkins and Dan-Eric Nilsson, and published recently at Evolution News. Dawkins had lectured (in real life) on Nilsson’s computer simulation work, showing the human eye could have evolved easily and quickly. What would the two of them have said when Nilsson contacted Dawkins and told him, “I’m sorry, Richard, but I didn’t do that simulation?” Wells imagines them talking about rushing the work on that simulation. But then, what about the next conversation when the simulation failed?

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On this episode of ID the Future, German paleo-entomologist Dr. Günter Bechly explains the real, living problem of living fossils — a term resisted by evolutionists though coined by Darwin himself and undeniably a living reality. These plants and animals have remained unchanged over eons: in the case of the horseshoe crab, nearly half a billion years through enormous upheaval.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, biologist Ann Gauger discusses an article in BIO-Complexity that she and Douglas Axe authored. Listen in as Dr. Gauger shares how she tested the changes necessary to evolve enzymes by a Darwinian mechanism, and stay tuned as she shares the results on our next podcast. Ann Gauger received a BS in biology from MIT, and a PhD in developmental biology from the University of Washington, where she studied cell adhesion molecules involved in Drosophila embryogenesis. As a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard she cloned and characterized the Drosophila kinesin light chain. Her research has been published in Nature, Development, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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On this episode of ID the Future, biophysicist Cornelius Hunter explains how mitochondria, the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, pose a powerful and newly acute problem for evolution. For years evolutionists thought that some early cells must somehow have brought other cells inside of them, and those other cells then mysteriously evolved into mitochondria. But recent research undermines that notion. Why do many evolutionists then still cling to the idea? Dr. Hunter’s answer explains how a lot of evolutionary thinking persists in the face of mounting contrary evidence.
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On this episode of ID the Future, paleoentomologist Günter Bechly discusses the new dragonfly fossil that he discovered, described, and named after intelligent design theorist Michael Behe--Chrismooreia michaelbehei. Bechly describes what’s remarkable about this stunning fossil, explains some problems dragonflies poses for Darwinism, and shares some of the strangely uninformed criticisms he’s received for naming the species after Behe. See pictures of the fossil on Evolution News: https://evolutionnews.org/2018/04/new-species-of-fossil-dragonfly-named-for-id-proponent-michael-behe/ Please consider donating to support the IDTF Podcast

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On this episode of ID The Future from the vault, Biologic Institute's Dr. Richard Sternberg explains what a gene is, how it works and how our understanding of genes and DNA has changed over the years. He also discusses the growing number of discoveries that are overturning the notion of junk DNA.

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On this episode of ID the Future, host Mike Keas talks with Sean McDowell about his book Understanding Intelligent Design: Everything You Need to Know in Plain Language, co-authored with William Dembski and released ten years ago. Sean talks about changes over the past ten years: Everyone has a smartphone and can, quicker than ever, find someone taking the other side of an argument, and many young people are trusting feelings more and science less. But some things haven’t changed, Sean argues: ID isn’t just good science, it’s good common sense. It just needs to be explained well.

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