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On this episode of ID the Future, Discovery Institute Senior Fellow Jay Richards speaks with astrobiologist Guillermo Gonzalez about new research just reported in the Astrophysical Journal. The research suggests that the circumstellar habitable zone for terrestrial planets around stars is narrower than previously thought. This zone around stars, often referred to as the “goldilocks zone,” is where planets are not too hot and not too cold to support liquid water on the surface and, with it, complex life. But there’s another factor, previously underappreciated, which greatly curtails how much further a planet can be situated from its host star without running into trouble. It makes earth’s position that much more fine-tuned for life and, as Richards and Gonzalez discuss, may also strengthen the design argument they put forward in their book The Privileged Planet, now available as an audiobook. 

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On this episode of ID the Future we hear a neurosurgeon’s view on materialistic bias afflicting the entire field of neuroscience. It’s a bias, he argues, that leads some scientists to misunderstand the meaning of their experiments. Darwinists “allergic to teleology” ignore clear evidence that purpose is essential to the mind. This talk is bonus material accompanying the action-filled and thought provoking series of short videos on science and materialism at scienceuprising.com.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, author Bruce Buff shares about his novel, The Soul of the Matter, which has drawn attention from Barnes & Noble and Publisher’s Weekly.

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On this episode of ID the Future we hear a neurosurgeon’s take on materialist philosophical views of the mind. One currently common view, eliminative materialism, says there is nothing to the mind except what goes on in the brain. But do brain studies involving both imaging and surgery deliver an emphatic rebuttal? The evidence, Egnor says, strongly suggests there’s more to the human mind than the physical, material brain alone can explain. His discussion is drawn from bonus material accompanying the new, action-filled and thought-provoking Science Uprising series of short videos on science, materialism, and intelligent design at scienceuprising.com

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On this episode of ID the Future we hear bonus material on the mind from the Discovery Institute’s new Science Uprising video series. Materialist philosophy says we’re no more than our brains; that we’re wet robots, in essence. Also, scientism, rooted in materialism, holds that science is the only path to knowledge. Here, a distinguished research neuroscientist take on those dogmatic claims and discusses some clinical evidence that mind is not reducible to the brain.

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On this episode of ID The Future from the vault, we’re featuring clips of questions and answers with Wesley J. Smith and John West from the premiere of The War on Humans documentary. Smith and West briefly answer questions about the threat of the fringe element of the radical animal rights movement; the advance of animal rights proponents' political agenda; and the regulatory process that is creeping towards scientism.

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On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher and Discovery Institute senior fellow Jay Richards shows how materialism is an acid that eats itself along with the self. Richards argues that it also eats all the immaterial things that make science work--all while posing as objective science. The interview is taken from Discovery Institute’s new Science Uprising initiative, featuring high-concept short YouTube videos and single-expert interviews touch on a wide range of subjects related to intelligent design, philosophical materialism, theism, atheism and modern Darwinism. Richards and other familiar faces are among the experts, along with two or three distinguished scientists who may be new to followers of ID the Future. Check it out here.

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On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Cornelius Hunter, author of Science's Blind Spot: The Unseen Religion of Scientific Naturalism, talks about new findings on so-called “junk” DNA. Evolutionary theory predicts lots of such “Darwinian detritus” that does nothing for organisms. That prediction keeps coming up false. “Satellite DNA” was one form of DNA thought to be junk, and left on the back burner by researchers. But now it’s been found to be both crucial — for the fertility of male fruit flies — and species-specific. Evolutionary theory expected none of this, though it gamely accommodate it, Hunter explains. How? By moving the goalposts.

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On this episode of ID the Future from the vault, Dr. Brian Miller examines evolutionary explanations for the development of the eye.  What is needed to build a complex eye? And how long would it take to get the necessary coordinated mutations? Miller argues the eye presents multiple insurmountable problems for evolution.

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On this episode of ID the Future, philosopher and Biola University Distinguished Philosopher J.P. Moreland talks with Michael Keas about the intelligent design implications of his new book Finding Quiet: My Story of Overcoming Anxiety and the Practices that Brought Peace. As Moreland explains, Darwin in essence said, in the beginning were the particles. But the evidence of design in nature and of a cosmic beginning from nothing, taken together, suggests instead, in the beginning was the Logos, was mind or organizing thought. And what we see in mental health treatments — or even in science itself, as Moreland has also written — only makes sense if we can trace reality back to an intelligent, purposeful cause. At the same time, Keas and Moreland stress, this is a call not to ignore the material but to rightly regard both the material and immaterial dimensions of the human person when pursuing mental health.

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